Angebote zu "Comedies" (4 Treffer)

Kategorien

Shops

Recurring Images of Women in Oscar Wilde's Come...
4,40 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2,7 (B-), Bielefeld University (Faculty für Linguistics and Literature Studies), course: Short Writings by Oscar Wilde, language: English, abstract: Reading the four comedies by Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest, one finds that the women figures in these plays seem to resemble more or less. Wilde appears to like the use of simplified and stereotyped characters like the often occurring womanwith- a-past, some late Victorian domineering matron or the Puritan. With the impression these give, the reader comes to wonder how Wilde himself thought of them and why they are such recurring motifs. Might they be a mirror for the women in his own life or would that be too far-fetched? I will try to proof in this essay that even though these four plays by Wilde as well as his woman figures give the impression as if they were really similar, they are at most alike, and the characters not easily comparable to persons in Wilde's life. The first three comedies all deal with someone who committed a secret sin in their past and is now confronted with this by meeting an old acquaintance. Though sinners they are in the end pardoned, because they remained good and pure in their hearts, which has to be proved most by Mrs Erlynne in Lady Windermere's Fan. She left her husband and baby to lead a life full of pleasure and returns half a year before her daughter's coming of age, drawn by the wish to join or rejoin society and pressing money from Lord Windermere. He allows this because Lady Windermere would lose all her ideals if she found out about the true fate of her mother, whom she glorified all her life supposing she was dead. Mrs Erlynne sacrifices her reputation in Act III to save her daughter's one, reminded of her own fault twenty years ago and motherly feelings having awoken not wanting her daughter to do the same mistake. [...]

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Love and dramatic genre - Approaches to the top...
12,40 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Examination Thesis from the year 2003 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, Bielefeld University, 71 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: 'Love' is a central topic in Shakespeare's plays. Many of his couples have gained a status of immortality: Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, or Beatrice and Benedick are only a few examples. These lovers share one experience, which Lysander in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' sums up very clearly: 'The course of true love never did run smooth ...' (1,1,134) This dilemma is the 'raw material' I am interested in. I will take three Shakespearean plays with 'love' as their central issue and examine the protagonists' courses of love in them. This involves the beginning, the obstacles in the way, the reactions to these obstacles and the final failure or success to overcome them. The plays chosen are 'Romeo and Juliet', 'All's Well that Ends Well', and 'The Taming of the Shrew'. In the First Folio edition the first one is classified as belonging to the literary form of 'tragedy', the latter two as 'comedies'. This leads me to the second element in the title, which is 'dramatic genre'. What Northrop Frye says about comedy is also valid for tragedy: 'If a play in a theatre is subtitled 'a comedy', information is conveyed to a potential audience about what kind of thing to expect, and this type of information has been intelligible since before the days of Aristophanes.' One such expectation concerns a play's mood. Here lies a fundamental difference between tragedy and comedy. Generally speaking, the audience expects that a comedy creates a happy mood and a tragedy a sad one. However, I am not alone finding that 'Romeo' is a rather happy play over long stretches, whereas 'The Taming' and 'All's Well' are anything but thoroughly happy pieces. In these three dramas Shakespeare only partly fulfils the expectations, which are evoked. Their generic structure does not generate a consistent mood. So what are the causes of this inconsistency?

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 10.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Recurring Images of Women in Oscar Wilde's Come...
2,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2,7 (B-), Bielefeld University (Faculty für Linguistics and Literature Studies), course: Short Writings by Oscar Wilde, language: English, abstract: Reading the four comedies by Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest, one finds that the women figures in these plays seem to resemble more or less. Wilde appears to like the use of simplified and stereotyped characters like the often occurring womanwith- a-past, some late Victorian domineering matron or the Puritan. With the impression these give, the reader comes to wonder how Wilde himself thought of them and why they are such recurring motifs. Might they be a mirror for the women in his own life or would that be too far-fetched? I will try to proof in this essay that even though these four plays by Wilde as well as his woman figures give the impression as if they were really similar, they are at most alike, and the characters not easily comparable to persons in Wilde's life. The first three comedies all deal with someone who committed a secret sin in their past and is now confronted with this by meeting an old acquaintance. Though sinners they are in the end pardoned, because they remained good and pure in their hearts, which has to be proved most by Mrs Erlynne in Lady Windermere's Fan. She left her husband and baby to lead a life full of pleasure and returns half a year before her daughter's coming of age, drawn by the wish to join or rejoin society and pressing money from Lord Windermere. He allows this because Lady Windermere would lose all her ideals if she found out about the true fate of her mother, whom she glorified all her life supposing she was dead. Mrs Erlynne sacrifices her reputation in Act III to save her daughter's one, reminded of her own fault twenty years ago and motherly feelings having awoken not wanting her daughter to do the same mistake. [...]

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 10.08.2020
Zum Angebot