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Words and phrases that are to do with sex in li...
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Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, Bielefeld University, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In his book 'Dr. Bowdler's Legacy' Noel Perrin tells us in the first chapter that a big change of morality took place with the turn of the nineteenth century in England. He puts it as follows: '... the first new generation of the nineteenth century (grew) up more strait-laced, inhibited, and conventional than its parents, so that sons discussed their fathers' wild oaths, and daughters worried about their mothers' loose sexual behaviour.' According to Perrin one of the cornerstones of this new way of thinking was that the people began to acquire a more reserved attitude towards sexuality. The chief cause of this tendency was what can be called the rise of the idea of delicacy, or 'the new prudery'. From the middle of the eighteenth century onwards, delicacy came to be regarded as a special and precious characteristic - especially among women. Basically, it means that people felt offended as soon as they were confronted with sexuality in whatever form. Blushing and fainting were outward indicators of this new propriety. Another consequence was that people began to keep away from anything that might be a burden on their conscience. An important result of this trend was the emergence of the idea of expurgation in literature. That is people simply started to remove 'words or scenes that were considered likely to offend or shock'. The pioneering work in this field was Dr. Bowdler's 'Family Shakespeare', which was published in 1807. Dr. Bowdler's aim was - according to the fashion of his time - 'to exclude from this publication whatever is unfit to be read aloud by a gentleman to a company of ladies'. In another passage he says that he wants to enable a father to read one of Shakespeare's plays to his family circle 'without incurring the danger of falling unawares among words and expressions which are of such a nature as to raise a blush on the cheek of modesty ...'. As he says in the preface to the first edition, Bowdler was primarily concerned with profanity and obscenity. In this essay I will constrict myself to the field of obscenity in its sexual dimension. In the first part of my paper I will watch a Victorian at work by examining Bowdler's version of 'Romeo and Juliet' and comparing it to Shakespeare's. What kind of words and passages does he change and in what way does he revise them? Does he treat different terms in different ways?

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 09.07.2020
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The legal and moral legitimation of war in Shak...
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Seminar paper from the year 2003 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, Bielefeld University (Fakultät für Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft), course: Shakespeare's History Plays, language: English, abstract: Das Referat behandelt die rechtliche und moralische Legitimation des Krieges in Shakespeares History Play Henry V, um damit zu klären, ob es sich um ein 'affirmative play' oder ein 'problem play' handelt.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
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Intertextuality in Ken Russel's 'Gothic': The r...
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Seminar paper from the year 1998 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1-, Bielefeld University (Fakultät für Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft), course: Motivgeschichte/Intertextualität: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, 11 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The film Gothic starring Gabriel Byrne (in the role of Lord Byron), Julian Sands (Percy Bysshe Shelley), Natasha Richardson (Mary [Wollstonecraft Godwin] Shelley), Myriam Cyr (Claire Clairmont) and Timothy Spall (Dr John Polidori) and directed by Ken Russell was made in 1986. It is difficult to decide whether the film is a horror film or a period film because it contains elements of both genres. The viewer's judgement depends on his or her previous knowledge of the life of the characters. If the viewer does not recognize the relation between the elements and statements in the film and texts written by and about the protagonists he or she will feel Gothic to be mainly a horror film. In other words intertextuality plays an important role in Gothic. Therefore, the aim of this term paper is to analyze the intertextual relations between the film and various texts. Since there are many different concepts concerning intertextuality I will mostly focus on Julia Kristeva's idea of intertextuality in the first chapter. In the second chapter the literary historical aspects of Gothic will be examined. The film is set in 1816, i.e. in the second phase of the Romantic period. I will analyze how Ken Russell represents some of the characteristics of the Romantic period in his film. Among others, a motif in the film is the artificial being and the creation of an artificial being respectively. This motif is also the topic of Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein. The third chapter deals on the one hand with the question how the motif 'artificial being' is represented in Ken Russell's film and on the other h

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Concepts of love in William Shakespeare's Romeo...
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Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, Bielefeld University, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Why was Shakespeare so successful in his times? How come, his plays drew the masses into the theatres? How did he manage to attract all these different groups of people with different backgrounds at the same time? These are the questions I will have in the back of my mind while writing this paper. I will examine one aspect of his style more closely, which I found in hisRomeo and Juliet.In doing so, I hope to give at least some small explanation of the reason of his overwhelming success. It was probably in 1595 when Shakespeare wrote this famous tragedy. He was doing so, living in a society which was leaving the Middle Ages far behind and rapidly growing in complexity. The English society was splitting up into a huge variety of different groups and organisations. The Reformation produced a wealth of new religious groupings. Especially the Puritans were to become very influential in England. The rise of the middle class was taking place under the reign of queen Elizabeth, which was combining artisans, merchants and the more prosperous peasants and was accumulating new resources and capital. The aristocracy was changing: It was opening up for new members, mostly wholesalers who had earned a fortune with the profitable overseas trade. The decline of the ancient system of feudalism was highly advanced, which for the common peasant meant that he wasn't tied to his small piece of soil any longer. He was much more mobile now. Family structures were changing as well. The kin (that is the enlarged family) as the main organising factor was beginning to lose ground to the smaller nuclear family.

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Love and dramatic genre - Approaches to the top...
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Examination Thesis from the year 2003 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, Bielefeld University, 71 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: 'Love' is a central topic in Shakespeare's plays. Many of his couples have gained a status of immortality: Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, or Beatrice and Benedick are only a few examples. These lovers share one experience, which Lysander in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' sums up very clearly: 'The course of true love never did run smooth ...' (1,1,134) This dilemma is the 'raw material' I am interested in. I will take three Shakespearean plays with 'love' as their central issue and examine the protagonists' courses of love in them. This involves the beginning, the obstacles in the way, the reactions to these obstacles and the final failure or success to overcome them. The plays chosen are 'Romeo and Juliet', 'All's Well that Ends Well', and 'The Taming of the Shrew'. In the First Folio edition the first one is classified as belonging to the literary form of 'tragedy', the latter two as 'comedies'. This leads me to the second element in the title, which is 'dramatic genre'. What Northrop Frye says about comedy is also valid for tragedy: 'If a play in a theatre is subtitled 'a comedy', information is conveyed to a potential audience about what kind of thing to expect, and this type of information has been intelligible since before the days of Aristophanes.' One such expectation concerns a play's mood. Here lies a fundamental difference between tragedy and comedy. Generally speaking, the audience expects that a comedy creates a happy mood and a tragedy a sad one. However, I am not alone finding that 'Romeo' is a rather happy play over long stretches, whereas 'The Taming' and 'All's Well' are anything but thoroughly happy pieces. In these three dramas Shakespeare only partly fulfils the expectations, which are evoked. Their generic structure does not generate a consistent mood. So what are the causes of this inconsistency?

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Recurring Images of Women in Oscar Wilde's Come...
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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2,7 (B-), Bielefeld University (Faculty für Linguistics and Literature Studies), course: Short Writings by Oscar Wilde, language: English, abstract: Reading the four comedies by Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest, one finds that the women figures in these plays seem to resemble more or less. Wilde appears to like the use of simplified and stereotyped characters like the often occurring womanwith- a-past, some late Victorian domineering matron or the Puritan. With the impression these give, the reader comes to wonder how Wilde himself thought of them and why they are such recurring motifs. Might they be a mirror for the women in his own life or would that be too far-fetched? I will try to proof in this essay that even though these four plays by Wilde as well as his woman figures give the impression as if they were really similar, they are at most alike, and the characters not easily comparable to persons in Wilde's life. The first three comedies all deal with someone who committed a secret sin in their past and is now confronted with this by meeting an old acquaintance. Though sinners they are in the end pardoned, because they remained good and pure in their hearts, which has to be proved most by Mrs Erlynne in Lady Windermere's Fan. She left her husband and baby to lead a life full of pleasure and returns half a year before her daughter's coming of age, drawn by the wish to join or rejoin society and pressing money from Lord Windermere. He allows this because Lady Windermere would lose all her ideals if she found out about the true fate of her mother, whom she glorified all her life supposing she was dead. Mrs Erlynne sacrifices her reputation in Act III to save her daughter's one, reminded of her own fault twenty years ago and motherly feelings having awoken not wanting her daughter to do the same mistake. [...]

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Perspektivische Interaktion im Roman
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How do we internalize literary characters and their fictional consciousness when we are reading? How does multi-perspectivity function? Drawing on modern cognitive research, this study addresses how the perspectives of different characters interact, and demonstrates that this interaction plays a critical role in our understanding and interpretation of literary texts. Using the English novel as an example, the author develops a general theory of perspectival interaction and demonstrates its explanatory power through detailed illustrative analyses. Marcus Hartner, University of Bielefeld, Germany.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 09.07.2020
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Intertextuality in Ken Russel's 'Gothic': The r...
9,30 € *
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Seminar paper from the year 1998 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1-, Bielefeld University (Fakultät für Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft), course: Motivgeschichte/Intertextualität: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, 11 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The film Gothic starring Gabriel Byrne (in the role of Lord Byron), Julian Sands (Percy Bysshe Shelley), Natasha Richardson (Mary [Wollstonecraft Godwin] Shelley), Myriam Cyr (Claire Clairmont) and Timothy Spall (Dr John Polidori) and directed by Ken Russell was made in 1986. It is difficult to decide whether the film is a horror film or a period film because it contains elements of both genres. The viewer's judgement depends on his or her previous knowledge of the life of the characters. If the viewer does not recognize the relation between the elements and statements in the film and texts written by and about the protagonists he or she will feel Gothic to be mainly a horror film. In other words intertextuality plays an important role in Gothic. Therefore, the aim of this term paper is to analyze the intertextual relations between the film and various texts. Since there are many different concepts concerning intertextuality I will mostly focus on Julia Kristeva's idea of intertextuality in the first chapter. In the second chapter the literary historical aspects of Gothic will be examined. The film is set in 1816, i.e. in the second phase of the Romantic period. I will analyze how Ken Russell represents some of the characteristics of the Romantic period in his film. Among others, a motif in the film is the artificial being and the creation of an artificial being respectively. This motif is also the topic of Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein. The third chapter deals on the one hand with the question how the motif 'artificial being' is represented in Ken Russell's film and on the other h

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 09.07.2020
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Words and phrases that are to do with sex in li...
8,30 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,0, Bielefeld University, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In his book 'Dr. Bowdler's Legacy' Noel Perrin tells us in the first chapter that a big change of morality took place with the turn of the nineteenth century in England. He puts it as follows: '... the first new generation of the nineteenth century (grew) up more strait-laced, inhibited, and conventional than its parents, so that sons discussed their fathers' wild oaths, and daughters worried about their mothers' loose sexual behaviour.' According to Perrin one of the cornerstones of this new way of thinking was that the people began to acquire a more reserved attitude towards sexuality. The chief cause of this tendency was what can be called the rise of the idea of delicacy, or 'the new prudery'. From the middle of the eighteenth century onwards, delicacy came to be regarded as a special and precious characteristic - especially among women. Basically, it means that people felt offended as soon as they were confronted with sexuality in whatever form. Blushing and fainting were outward indicators of this new propriety. Another consequence was that people began to keep away from anything that might be a burden on their conscience. An important result of this trend was the emergence of the idea of expurgation in literature. That is people simply started to remove 'words or scenes that were considered likely to offend or shock'. The pioneering work in this field was Dr. Bowdler's 'Family Shakespeare', which was published in 1807. Dr. Bowdler's aim was - according to the fashion of his time - 'to exclude from this publication whatever is unfit to be read aloud by a gentleman to a company of ladies'. In another passage he says that he wants to enable a father to read one of Shakespeare's plays to his family circle 'without incurring the danger of falling unawares among words and expressions which are of such a nature as to raise a blush on the cheek of modesty ...'. As he says in the preface to the first edition, Bowdler was primarily concerned with profanity and obscenity. In this essay I will constrict myself to the field of obscenity in its sexual dimension. In the first part of my paper I will watch a Victorian at work by examining Bowdler's version of 'Romeo and Juliet' and comparing it to Shakespeare's. What kind of words and passages does he change and in what way does he revise them? Does he treat different terms in different ways?

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 09.07.2020
Zum Angebot